Sewaneetian  -  \swä-ˈnē-shәn\ 

-noun 

1) native, inhabitant, visiting or permanent student, tuition-paying-responsible-party, professor, theolog, priest, P.K., Assembly Person or family living in, around or on the verge of Sewanee (or in imitation of a style typical or indicative of Sewaneetians).  

2) one who has, purposefully or otherwise, stumbled in, through, along, into and throughout Sewanee, breathed the air, climbed, crawled, run, hiked or mountain biked the Perimeter or Mountain Goat Trail, tapped an angel, shopped at ‘the Pig’, drunk an icy beverage with a local artist, got jiggy with the string section in the July 4th parade, entered a dog in the mutt show, and/or basked in the smells, bells and splendorocity of Lessons and Carols.  

3) You’ve lived through the grey winter. You’ve driven the ubiquitous fog. The cute deer eating your garden enrage you. The Post Office excites you. 

You know who you are. You’re a Sewaneetian. You’re a Local. 

 

Locals once housed a grocery, a dry cleaner and a bank until the interior was renovated by local craftsmen in wood, stone and brick in the style of Arts and Crafts. Now a living part of the village of Sewanee, Locals is a place where life around the mountain is reflected in art.  

Leaves are gathered from the mountain and Lost Cove and naturally, elegantly etched into copper by G. Sanford McGee. Sanford is a local with longstanding interest and education in chemistry and biology and a lifelong curiosity about how we fit together with nature. Sanford's focus is in creating artful architecture in the most macrobiotic manner available and his work is stunning and has found it's place in homes across the country.

Susan Church uses beautiful ‘wood scraps’ to create clever, rare hand-tooled boxes with whimsical one-of-a-kind bronze castings of animals and playful characters specially made with Susan's boxes in mind by her friend Jeanie Stephenson. Susan builds her boxes masterfully, finding wood with natural holes and purposefully perching Jeanie’s bronze bunny peering down the rabbit hole. There are cats falling off the natural edge of a box top or elephants and porpoises swimming through the wood, with the wood grain circles serving as a wake in the water. 

Jim Ann Howard has a passion for the “thing closely observed” and a naturalist’s insatiable curiosity. She’s spent the last 20 or so years wandering the glorious hills and hollows as a resident of rural Tennessee. Working almost exclusively on paper and/or linen, Jim Ann makes inks and paints out of walnuts, ground rocks and clays because she loves the color, the process and the economy of it all. 

Jeanie Stephenson, who has collaborated for years with Susan Church to create bronze characters topping Church’s boxes, also offers her larger bronze works at Locals.  Jeanie uses the ancient “lost wax” method to produce sculptures, influenced by observations as a former Biologist, traveler and from memory and imagination.

A welder by trade and artist by nature, Jamey "Otis" Chernicky forges and hammers iron, steel and sheet metal with great imagination, creating a wide range of artwork varying in size from large sculpted angels to a massive owl sitting on a branch, all done in forged metal and sometimes finished in bronze. Jamey uses scrap metals from leftover sprinkler system installations, rebar steel and salvaged car hoods, bumpers and doors to form larger than life tortoise shells hanging in lofts and perched in gardens all over the country. 

Jimmy Abegg paints magnificent characters, faces, landscapes and abstracts on every texture imaginable, including foreign magazine pages and old pencil scratch architectural studies, paper on burlap coffee bags on wood, hand-stretched linen and canvas.  His abstracts are compelling and landscapes of the valley and views from the cross, off the mountain, are stunning and rich and hanging on the walls of Locals. The faces of his saints are memorable and often haunting and the textures he chooses are fascinating.

Thomas Spake’s work with glass as a sculptural material, is an intensely fragile and physical art form.  His glassblowing ranges in scale from small glass ornaments and paperweights to beautiful, thin, flutter vases, vessels, urns and outdoor glass sculpture.  Thomas grew up in a small town in Georgia, studied at Centre College in Kentucky, and recently transplanted his studio just down the mountain in Jasper, Tennessee.

Raydarr’ (W.C. Craig) spends as much time as possible with friends “out Jumpoff”…so much time, in fact, that he calls his hand embellished walking sticks and staffs “Jumpoff Sticks”.  Most of Raydarr’s sticks start as found or cut saplings or limbs that have fallen or those he prunes from overgrown yards and vacant lots.  He has a knack for finding really interesting woods – Crabapple, Swamp Cypress, Black Locust…Red Mulberry and Magnolia – and by the time he’s done with them, they’re as soft as satin and tattooed with his cool designs, lines, squiggles and hieroglyphics. 

Nancy Wallace creates sculptural art in the functional form of books. With pages left blank to be filled as they may, the front and back covers of Nancy's books are every bit unique. For her wooden covers, Nancy carves intricate scenes she then paints to life, while others focus on the wood's natural grain with landscapes of engraved burn patterns. All of Nancy's books are hand-done with a beautiful Ethiopian-style binding. Most recently Nancy has added leather-clad journals to her growing variety of one of a kind books.  

As a goldsmith, Connie Ulrich hand fashions each piece of her jewelry with design inspirations drawn from the natural beauty of her Tennessee mountain farm. At once organic, the jewelry Connie creates holds fast to the intrigue of contrast: stream-smoothed pebbles meet the shimmer of textured 18k gold, while twigs of sterling silver encase a freshwater pearl. But no matter the form or material, Connie's jewelry is not just art you can wear. It's art with a story. 

 

Tucked away in a Cumberland Plateau studio, James Tucker creates works of pen & ink and acrylic. Often born of plein air sketches, Tucker’s art depicts sights both urban and countryside. Sketches for many of his rural acrylic paintings are drawn atop his sailboat as he explores the banks of the Tennessee River. Though Tucker’s urban works are inspired by his travels well beyond Tennessee, they are equal parts observation. In Jim's cityscape scenes, figures serve prominent as simple black silhouettes, each character’s story wrapped in what surrounds them.  

 

For more information:

Ashley Charlton, Manager - Locals at Sewanee

49 University Avenue
  Sewanee, Tennessee 

localsatsewanee@icloud.com   865.567.5563

 

www.localsatsewanee.com

‹‹ Return to Myers Point

Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 1

LOCALS…Artisans & Craftsmen of the Sewanee Region 

2016 Spring & Summer Season:

May 4 - July 30, 2016

Wednesday-Saturday ; noon-5pm

Featuring regional artists, Jim Ann Howard, G. Sanford McGee, Jimmy Abegg, Susan Church, Jamey “Otis” Chernicky, Connie Ulrich, Thomas Spake, W.C. “Raydarr” Craig, Jeanie Stephenson, Bill Mauzy, Bean & Bailey, James Tucker, Victoria P. Pearmain and Nancy Wallace

 

Or by appointment:  Ashley Charlton 865.567.5563

localsatsewanee@icloud.com

49 University Avenue

 Sewanee, TN  37375

 

www.jimmyabegg.com

www.mcgeestudio.com

www.thomasspakestudios.com

www.stephensonsbronze.com

www.tomchurchstudio.com

www.connieulrich.com

www.imbricatewood.com

www.beanandbaileyceramics.com

www.jacksonpointart.com 

https://victoriapearmain.wordpress.com